What's On PBS?

In celebration of Black History Month, February 2010, PBS will broadcast a lineup of new and encore presentations honoring and exploring African-American history. This line up of programs will explore the rich heritage and cultural contributions of African Americans to this country and provide the basis for a wide variety of cross-curricular units of study aligned to content area standards.

Click here for a complete listing of PBS Programming celebrating Black History Month.

Click here for Eight's programming schedule.
-KUAT viewers, click here.

Note to Teachers:

PBS has secured the rights for PreK-12 teachers to tape or digitally record and use off-air recordings of most of its programming for a period of approximately one year. Click here for more information on Copyright and Fair Use of PBS Content.

Teachers should always preview all programs and Web materials to determine they are appropriate for your students. Some resources may not be appropriate for younger students.

For more information on using visual media effectively in your classroom, visit the National Teacher Training Institute Web site.

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Programs of Particular Interest to Educators This Month Include:

In Performance at the White House: "Music of the Civil Rights Era"
Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 10 p.m. - Program Website

This concert, hosted by President and Mrs. Obama in the East Room of the White House, features music that galvanized the U.S. civil rights movement of the late 1950s and 1960s. Guests include Jennifer Hudson, John Legend, Seal, Smokey Robinson and the Blind Boys of Alabama.

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Stokes: An American Dream
Sunday, Feb. 14 at 12:30 p.m. - Program Website

Stokes: An American Dream profiles two African-American brothers who changed the course of American politics Louis and Carl Stokes. Carl, the first black mayor of a major American city, and Louis, the first black U.S. congressman from Ohio, overcame humble beginnings in their pursuit of high political office. During the film, historians and politicians tell of the two brothers' ambition, perseverance and selfless determination to use their positions to help the less fortunate. The documentary also offers intimate recollections from their friends and colleagues, including President Barack Obama, Jesse Jackson and former Cleveland Mayor Mike White.

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For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots
Mondays, Feb. 15 and 22 at 9 p.m. - Program Website

For Love of Liberty: The Story of America's Black Patriots utilizes letters, diaries, speeches, journalistic accounts, historical text and military records to document the profound sacrifices and largely ignored contributions of African-American servicemen and women. The story, seven years in the making, spans the American Revolution to the Iraq War and examines why, despite enormous injustice, these men and women fought so valiantly for freedoms they themselves did not enjoy. The two, two-hour films are introduced by Colin Powell, hosted on-camera by Halle Berry and narrated by Avery Brooks.

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Blacking Up: Hip-Hop's Remix of Race and Identity
Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 11:30 p.m. - Program Website

Blacking Up explores racial identity through the lens of hip-hop music and culture. The film focuses in particular on the tensions that surround white identification with hip-hop. Popularly referred to by derogatory terms such as "wannabe" or "wigger," the white person who identifies with hip-hop often invokes heated responses. For some, it is an example of cultural progress a movement toward a color-blind America. For others, it is just another case of cultural theft and mockery a repetition of a racist past. Blacking Up probes these different responses, constructing a dialogue on race that draws parallels from American history and incorporates the well-known rappers, and assortment of young fans and hip-hop hopefuls, among others.
Program Note: "Viewer discretion is advised" NOTE TO EDUCATORS: Content unsuitable for younger students.

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Scarred Justice: The Orangeburg Massacre 1968
Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 11:30 p.m. - Program Website

Called "the Kent State of the South" and pre-dating it by two years, the shooting of 30 African-American students by white policemen marked the first time in U.S. history that police opened fire on students. Three of the young men died. This film attempts to lift the veil of secrecy around the event and bring justice to the victims.

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Herskovits At the Heart of Blackness
Premieres Tuesday, 2/2 - Program Website

Who has the right to define a culture? When a white, Jewish intellectual named Melville Herskovits asserted in the 1940s that black culture was not pathological, but in fact grounded in deep African roots, he gave vital support to the civil rights movement and signaled the rise of identity politics. But what does it mean that his subjects had little or no say in the academic discourse about them?

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Prince Among Slaves
Program Website

Find online reseurces from this award winning documentary features the inspiring true story of Abdul Rahman, an African Muslim prince who endured the horrific Middle Passage and survived 40 years of enslavement in America before finally regaining his freedom. The documentary, part of PBS' tribute to Black History Month, is a presentation of the National Black Programming Consortium.

Arizona Academic Standard Connection
See connection 1, 2, 6, 7

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Slavery and the Making of America
Program Website

This groundbreaking series chronicles the institution of American slavery from its origins in 1619 - when English settlers in Virginia purchased 20 Africans from Dutch traders - through the arrival of the first 11 slaves in the northern colonies (in Dutch New Amsterdam), the American Revolution, the Civil War, the adoption of the 13th Amendment and Reconstruction. Morgan Freeman narrates.

Arizona Academic Standard Connection
See connection 1, 2, 6, 7

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Eyes on the Prize II
A Special Presentation of American Experience
Program Website

The series documents the journey of black Americans seeking justice, power and identity, from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s, and shows the profound effect this movement had on all Americans. A guide to lessons specific for middle schools can be found here.

Arizona Academic Standard Connection
See connection 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

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Recommended resources from PBS Teachers

African-Americans in the American West

Classroom resources gathered for the PBS series The West provide background information to examine the treatment of African and Native Americans by the U.S. government and other westward migrants. Also discussed is how the selection of evidence by historians influences perceptions of later generations.

Grade Level: 7-12
Subjects: Social Studies
Topics: Cultural Studies: African American Studies, Cultural Studies: Native American Studies
Resource Type: Lesson Plan

Arizona Academic Standard Connection
See connection 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7

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From Slavery To Freedom

Consider the liberating effect literacy and the ability to write had on slaves in the mid-19th century. Understand slave narratives as both social pieces of work and popular literature.

Subjects: Reading & Language Arts, Social Studies
Topics: Non-Fiction: Biography and Autobiography, Cultural Studies: African American Studies
Resource Type: Lesson Plan

Arizona Academic Standard Connection
See connection 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7

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What We Leave Behind

Source: Slavery and the Making of America

Explore the autobiography of Harriet Jacobs, who spent seven years hidden in an attic to escape slavery while working for her children's freedom. Make critical decisions on items to leave behind for future generations of students in a time capsule.

Subjects: Reading & Language Arts, Social Studies
Topics: Non-Fiction: Biography and Autobiography, Cultural Studies: African American Studies, United States History: 1801-1861
Resource Type: Lesson Plan

Arizona Academic Standard Connection
See connection 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

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Standards Connection

Connection 1
Social Studies: Grades 6 – 8

  • Strand 1: American History
  - Concept 1: Research Skills for History (PO: all)
 

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Connection 2
Social Studies: Grades: 7
  • Strand 1: American History
  - Concept 6: Civil War and Reconstruction
  o P.O. 4: Analyze the impact of the Civil War on the following personal, social, and economic aspects of American life:
  a. Americans fighting Americans
  b. high casualties caused by disease and the type of warfare
  c. widespread destruction of American property
  d. change in status of freed slaves
  e. value of railroads and industry
 

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Connection 3
Social Studies: Grades: 8
  • Strand 1: American History
  - Concept 9: Postwar U.S. – Postwar tensions led to social change in the U.S. and to a heightened focus on foreign policy.
  o P.O. 6: Describe the importance of the following civil rights issues and events:
  a. Jim Crow Laws
  b. nonviolent protests
  c. desegregation
  d. Civil Rights Act of 1964
  e. Voting Rights Act of 1965
 

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Connection 4
Language Arts – Reading: Grades: 6 – 8
  • Strand 3: Comprehending Informational Text
  - Concept 1: Expository Text - Identify, analyze, and apply knowledge of the purpose, structures, and elements of expository text. (PO: all)
 

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Connection 5
Language Arts – Writing: Grades: 6 – 8
  • Strand 3: Writing Applications
  - Concept 2: Expository - Expository writing includes non-fiction writing that describes, explains, informs, or summarizes ideas and content. The writing supports a thesis based on research, observation, and/or experience. (PO: all)
 

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Connection 6
Social Studies: Grades: 9-12
  • Strand 1: American History
  - Concept 1: Research Skills for History (PO: All)
 

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Connection 7
Social Studies: Grades: 9-12
  • Strand 1: American History
  - Concept 6: Civil War and Reconstruction (PO: 3) Analyze immediate and long term effects of Reconstruction in post Civil War America:
  a. various plans for reconstruction of the South
  b. Lincoln's assassination
  c. Johnson's impeachment
  d. Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments
  e. resistance to and end of Reconstruction (e.g., Jim Crow laws, KKK, Compromise of 1877)
 

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Connection 8
Social Studies: Grades: 9-12
  • Strand 1: American History
  - Concept 7: Emergence of the Modern U.S. (PO: 2)
Assess how the following social developments influenced American society in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries:
  a. Civil Rights issues (e.g., Women's Suffrage Movement, Dawes Act, Indian schools, lynching, Plessy v. Ferguson)
  b. changing patterns in Immigration (e.g., Ellis Island, Angel Island, Chinese Exclusion Act, Immigration Act of 1924)
  c. urbanization and social reform (e.g., health care, housing, food & nutrition, child labor laws)
  d. mass media (e.g., political cartoons, muckrakers, yellow journalism, radio)
  e. consumerism (e.g., advertising, standard of living, consumer credit)
  f. Roaring Twenties (e.g., Harlem Renaissance, leisure time, jazz, changed social mores)
 

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